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GNPC cautioned on ‘Operatorship’ goal as ET agenda poses threat – NRGI

Adnan Adams Mohammed

The National Oil Company (NOC) of Ghana has been cautioned to thread consciously in the spirit of achieving its ambition of becoming Oil and Gas production operator in a few years time.

The caution comes at the time, the global economic frontiers are committing to the Energy Transition (ET) agenda strongly as majority of the economies set to meet net zero carbonisation by 2040.

Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) plans to be Operator by 2025, and therefore seeking to invest significantly in exploration, development and production of oilfields. The recent attempt was the intention to buy stakes in Aker operated DWTCP oilfield yet to be developed at estimated budget of about US$1.5 billion. Though, as controversial as the deal was, the acquisition process has stalled. But, an Energy Transition expert with the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) is pessimistic with GNPC recouping its investment as the ET agenda takes to a ‘fast transition’ by 2040 at when a barrel of crude may sell at US$20 averagely.     

“About three continents of the world economies plans to be net zero by 2040, so if they achieve that goal, GNPC has about 15 years of time before oil runs up. Is that the future to aspire? Is it good for Ghana? I don’t know”, David Manley quizzed rhetorically in an interview at the sideline of a two-day training program for selected media and CSOs representatives at Aburi in the Eastern Region of Ghana last week.

The West African Regional Manager, Nafi Chenery, in her remarks called on governments’ to listen to people and as well as speak to different stakeholders, particularly those who already have some information and knowledge about energy transition, so they  can help share their knowledge and skills on the issues to improve on government’s efforts at making things better

She posited that, the plans by government must speak to our realities and our context as Ghana and the world which has the potential to propel the country to the next level.

“So we need to put in a lot of effort and prepare and ensure that whatever plans we are putting in place is representative of the views and voices of all sectors. Right that the plan speaks to our realities and our context as Ghana and the world, one has a potential to propel us to the next level.”

“And so governments should listen to people and speak to different stakeholders, particularly those who already have some information and knowledge about energy transition, you know and share their knowledge and skills to improve on government transport,” Nafi Chinery said.

She said energy transition plans need to be just,  inclusive and need to be participatory by all.

Participants were excited about training and hopes it helps them improve on their works and writeups as CSOs and media respectively

The energy transition is a pathway toward a transformation of the global energy sector from fossil-based to zero-carbon by the second half of this century. At its heart is the need to reduce energy-related CO2 emissions to limit climate change.

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